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Our Goals:

  • Host low cost spay/neuter clinics
  • Conduct public vaccine and microchipping events
  • Educate citizens on the health benefits of spay/neuter and inform them of the economic savings of reduced shelter population

Imagine a world where nearly every homeless animal gets adopted; where people do not have to care for a large number of animals that just show up on their doorstep.  There are places like this in the United States. Why not make Northwest Arkansas one of them?

In 2007, Spay Arkansas was formed as a nonprofit to work towards proactive solutions to our pet population problem.  Reducing the number of animals by offering low cost spay/neuter services is part of the answer to pet overpopulation.  Active adoption events by shelters and rescues combined with transport of animals out of our area, to communities where animals are needed, has resulted in a reduction in the total number of animals euthanized. And, there is still work to be done.

9,500 animals entered our local shelters in 2012 .  Approximately 24% of these animals – 2,245 – where euthanized.  Comparing these numbers to 2011 figures where 10,600 animals found themselves in a shelter environment, we have made progress.  In that year, 3,800 animals were destroyed because there were not enough homes.  The euthanasia rate that year was 36%. We continue to seek further reduction in these numbers and are committed to providing every citizen who wants their pet altered  that opportunity at a price that is within their means.

Since Spay Arkansas opened the doors for low cost altering of dogs and cats in 2011, more than 15,000 surgeries have been performed.  Our independent doctors of veterinary medicine and trained staff perform, on average, 35 operations each day.

Low income citizens, rescue groups and shelters are welcome to have their pets altered at a price that is affordable.   We know that 70% of the animals that enter shelters come from the lowest income households, so why not save the taxpayers  money, save the animals needless suffering and limit the negative psychological impact upon our shelter workers?  Let’s continue this important work and create a community where companion animals are given the care that they deserve.